HOW TO APPRECIATE MONGOLIAN NATIONAL WRESTLING


It is Naadam time in Mongolia –a nomadic festival celebrated at the very least for centuries, and an important time for Mongolian wrestlers and horse-trainers, horse-riders and archers. The naadam tradition is truly ancient in its origins, predating, perhaps by millennia, the rise of Chinggis Khaan (Genghis Khaan) in the early Thirteenth Century. Naadam can be equated to the original Olympic Games of ancient Greece. During the summer months, local naadams are held all over Mongolia. The biggest of them is the State Naadam held every July in Ulaanbaatar. Only the State Naadam awards national wrestling titles to successful participants. Click here to read more


HOW TO APPRECIATE MONGOLIAN HORSE RACING


You are in Mongolia, the land of horse riders and horse lovers. There is one horse for every Mongolian. By the end of 2014 or the beginning of 2015, Mongolia is expected to have 3 million people and the same number of horses. If there is a horse racing event during your visit to Mongolia, we recommend you attend as Mongolian horse racing is unique.

Click here to read more


HOW TO APPRECIATE MONGOLIAN NATIONAL ARCHERY


You are on the naadam field. Look around. Do you see wrestling or horseracing? Or do you see men, women and children shooting arrows from their bows? If you see the latter, you are at the Naadam archery field. Although the smallest of all the naadam fields, the archery field is the busiest throughout the naadam. Archery completion begins four days before the naadam’s official opening ceremony and ends when the 5th round of the wrestling contest concludes. Click here to read more


HOW TO APPRECIATE THE MONGOLIAN ANKLE-BONE SHOOTING


Even though naadam’s original nickname is “three manly games” meaning wrestling, horse-racing and archery, a fourth game came into the naadam’s official agenda in 1998, mongolian ankle-bone shooting (Shagain Harvaa), another UNESCO registered world heritage. At each naadam, you will find a tent area or building space dedicated to ankle-bone shooting games. Once you are there, you should recall this explanation to understand the game.

Click here to read more


NINE JEWELS OF MONGOLIAN FOLK ART


1. Long song (Urtiin Duu) Almost every Mongolian folk concert begins with a long song, a song with long notes. Think of it as opera aria of the steppe. In the past, when a nomadic herder rode a long way from home to round up his wandering horses, and when the Mongolian warriors rode thousands of miles across Euro-Asia, the long song served as the main entertainment – a way to overcome the long rides and encourage the man’s closest ally—his horse! A competent long song singer uses different techniques than does an opera singer. She or he sings using so called “open voice” with a relatively closed mouth. With usual opera techniques, a singer cannot exploit her or his natural “open voice” as they use mouth movement to moderate their voice. Click here to read more


QUOTA IN, QUOTA OUT

March 8, 2008. Ulaanbaatar


quota_thumbnail

I am a woman politician. I chose to be a politician when I was 26. It is important to stand up for principles, defend human rights and effect positive changes for our children’s future. However, it took many years to be recognized as a politician.

My first struggle was with the most important man in my life. It was 1997. When I said that I wished to speak up in the media about the political situation in the country, his response was “consider yourself divorced if you speak up in the media. I don’t want to be married to a woman who is gossiped about in the newspapers.” One year later, when my interview appeared in a weekly newspaper I was already divorced.
Click here to read more


SAVING CHILDREN'S SOCCER FIELDS

Part of the Struggle Against Predatory Development in Ulaanbaatar


When he approached the football field, he saw a shower of small stones falling on the tractor scoop. The tractor's windows were broken. About a hundred primary school children were throwing stones at the tractor and yelling 'Go away! Leave our field alone!' Then one of children shouted, 'Our football teacher is coming!' This excited everybody and the children began shouting louder, "Go away! Take your tractor away!" The shower of stones became more intense.

Enkhtaivan raised his hands and shouted as loudly as he could. "Children stop! Let me talk to the tractor operator."
Click here to read more


WHAT SHALL WE DO ABOUT THE SO-CALLED "STABILITY AGREEMENT" THAT CAUSES INSTABILITY?

Udriin Sonin (daily newspaper), 2006-04-17, issue 094


“Ivanhoe Mines’ stock price reached 15 dollars and 40 cents at the Toronto Stock Exchange.” “You may buy stocks of Oyu Tolgoi at this price.” “Mongolian stock exchange launched its technical preparation for you to buy Oyu Tolgoi’s stocks.” These surprising news announcements emerged amid the citizen protest movements and the Democratic Party’s decision to say “no” to any stability agreement.

First of all, let’s say “Wait a minute!” to the Mongolian Stock Exchange. Exactly what prompted the stock exchange to make its surprise announcement? Whose property is it offering to sell and to whom?
Click here to read more


MISTAKES AND RIGHTNESS OF THE DEMOCRATIC UNION COALITION

Mongolia’s Political Chronic of 1996-2000
TV Serial of Seven Parts
(Translated from Mongolian by Chinbat Emgen)


parliament in session

Issues how to form the new Cabinet and resolve internal organizational structure were raised one after one in hours before the winners, representatives of democratic forces which never ruled the country before.

That is why shortly after the election, two days later the coalition leadership paid a visit to Mr. Ochirbat, Mongolian president and informed on their proposal to appoint Mr. R. Gonchigdorj, Chairman of the Mongolian Social Democratic Party as Speaker of the Mongolian Parliament (Great State Hural ), Mr. M. Enkhsaikhan, secretary general of the Democratic Union Coalition as Prime Minister of Mongolia and Mr. Ts. Elbegdorj, leader of the MNDP as vice speaker of the Parliament.
Click here to read more


WOMEN STAND UP FOR EQUALITY AND RIGHTS

Mongol Messenger (weekly English newspaper), March 14, 2007


TVinterview

At the core of the fight for women’s rights has been the struggle for the recognition of women’s achievements and contributions to society. Women in the forefront of the struggle never said, “Love us because we are weaker and more fragile.” They demonstrated publicly and loudly saying, “We work hard. Don’t value our work less than that of others.”

Today is March eight. What rights does a woman have now? You have the right to study. You have the right to vote and to run for an office. You also have the right to work, have a vacation, speak freely and publish. You now have the right to establish your family according to your wish, own private property, and share the family property. You are entitled to equal payment for equal employment. You can petition government, have fair trial, get legal advice, call for assistance, receive protection from violence, even have a women’s quota in the election. In short, women now have numerous rights and freedoms.
Click here to read more


WAKE UP & WRITE ABOUT US

A Testimony by Oyungerel Tsedevdamba


"Six Degrees" Magazine, Stanford
Contributions by Naomi Abasta-Vilaplana, Alexandra Goldman, and Jess Steinberg


sixdegrees

Many who come to my office have their case written and spread out via Internet and newspapers. Sometimes, I write at my own initiative. From 2000 to 2003, as a human rights activist and executive director of Liberty Center I wrote 40 alerts in English and in Mongolian. I also did a number of new things I have never done at any of my other paid jobs.

These included free social activities to raise money for the center, organizing campaigns against human rights violations, maintaining websites, setting up a new library, publishing handbooks and leaflets, organizing training, giving legal advice, and working with the domestic and international human rights communities. While learning myself, I have been training non-lawyer activists for all provinces of Mongolia.


Click here to read more